It's hard work listening to climate sceptics

I get annoyed with climate sceptics. I read an article recently in the Independent and the number of ranting comments from climate sceptics, based on hopeless evidence, really got my goat. I accepted that if I argued with them, I'd get nowhere. Instead, I wrote this comment: Read More...

Doctor Who: Season six and my Tarditis

I've written another article for a Sci-Fi Now competition (I am doing proper writing projects too but I think it's good practice!). This one is a review of Doctor Who: Season 6. Here it is:

It was near the end of Doctor Who season six that I knew I'd developed Tarditis.  Read More...

Letter to Boris: Electric taxis in London

I thought I'd send a letter to Boris Johnson putting forward the idea of introducing electric taxis in London. Read More...

Sketch for Radio 4 show 'Newsjack' - David Cameron hires a zombie

Here's another sketch I've sent to the Radio 4 Newsjack programme. Old cuddly David gets satirised again... Read More...

Sketch for Radio 4 show 'Newsjack' - David Cameron cooks breakfast

Here's a script I've sent to the Radio 4 Newsjack programme, a snippet of political satire... Read More...

October news

Hope everyone's enjoying their Autumn (unless you're in the Southern Hemisphere in which case I hope you're enjoying your Spring). Just to let everyone know that I've updated/made new pages describing my progress with my Ancient Mysteries story, my fantasy comedy and my comedy scripts. I've also added an article talking about some of what I've learnt through several years of writing. I've already blogged about the subject here but I thought I'd give it its own page. Apart from that, I'm furiously working on several projects and drowning my sorrows over regular rejections with large amounts of tea. I've also been tearing a shed apart. For anyone frustrated and angered about the modern world and the human condition, I strongly recommend tearing a shed apart. One caveat; choose a rotten one. They come apart fairly easily...

New Scientist caption competition

Being an ardent fan of the New Scientist magazine, I couldn't resist entering its caption competition. The picture is as follows:



My entries were:

'Are you sure this'll be okay, Dr Jekyll?'

and

'And with that final drop, they had created the world's strongest espresso'

New Scientist are running one every week for four weeks, no purchase necessary!

My Star Wars: conception article is on the Sci Fi now website

A modified version of my earlier article: Star Wars is about conception is now on the Sci Fi Now website. They've run a series of entries from different people describing their memories of that great film. It's fun and a bit weird to see my musings on a professional website. Fortunately, it seems to be liked so far! :) Read More...

I've joined CND

I've joined C.N.D, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. I'm not an impulsive type (I bought a new bicycle frame last week after two years of searching around and weighing up the pro's and cons) and joining CND has also taken years of thought. Read More...

Jonathan Cape Graphic Short Story 2011

Here's my four page entry for the 2011 Jonathan Cape Graphic Short story competition. I entered the competition last year with a mad dash entry reported here. This year, I've tried to make it a little more adult, more about an emotional drama. Read More...

The film 'Star Wars' is really about... conception!

I loved the first ‘Star Wars’ film, I still do. I don’t think any film will ever have as profound affect on me as that movie. A big part of its influence was because of its timing. It came out when I was seven years old; a skinny kid living in suburban london who loved fantastic ideas and stirring stories. I wanted something big and awe-inspiring and slick and glorious and grandiose and absurdly naive. Read More...

Cyclists or teddy bears; who's the most dangerous?

A hot topic this month in the world of British cycling has been the plan by Tory MP Andrea Leadsom to bring in a new Bill to target dangerous cyclists (Covered here among other places).

Although the number of people killed in the UK by cyclists is around one every other year, she still feels it's important to send a message to these two-wheeled potential killers. The example she has given of a cyclist killing someone is a case where a cyclist hit a pedestrian who'd strayed into the road. To make things worse, he'd reportedly shouted at her 'I'm not going to stop!' before he hit her. Read More...

Graphic novel progress - Decisions, decisions...

Oooh, it's difficult to decide. After talking at length here about the qualities of vector illustration, I've been drawn back to my pencil shaded black and white work. I was examining one of my black and white illustrations for my fantasy comedy novel and wondered what it would look like coloured. I got my water based ink brush pens out (Tombo ABT dual brush pens) and inked in most of the picture. I then finished it off with some gouache to the face, hands and the strange eggy lump on the door. Read More...

How Herge drew Tintin

I mentioned in the last blog entry about creating a graphic novel with a 'clear line' style. I used Tintin as an example of this method. For those who are interested, there's a very useful article about Herge's methods on the National Maritime Museum website of all places. Check it out here. It's fascinating to see how the page develops; where the 'life' of the story appears and at what point it looks polished and professional.

Read More...

Graphic novel progress - Colour vectorising a pencil sketch

After three weeks of working away (in between other bits and bobs), I've made some progress on the graphic novel. The first week or so was spent investigating whether I could do the work in gouache - a sort of paint similar to watercolour but less watery (I know that's not a very technical or accurate description but it'll do). I've done gouache illustrations before, I've popped one alongside this text.

I found though that it is a slow job doing the gouache. I think I'd need to spend six months or probably longer just practicing the gouache to get good enough to churn out an entire page of gouache illustration in one day (my target rate). Juanjo Guarnido - the Blacksad artist - has certainly found a way to produce his painted artwork at a viable rate but he's spent years doing fine art followed by more years working as a Disney animator. That's a lot of practice!

Read More...

Climate Change and what trees are made from

I noticed this week that the New Scientist has a one page advert from the Spectator magazine, announcing an upcoming debate on Climate Change. It is introduced as follows:

“The number of people in the UK who do not believe in global warming has doubled in the last two years, according to a poll from the office of national statistics. Does this represent the common sense of a British public who can see the claims of the climate alarmists dissolve before their eyes?”



It’s an interesting choice of phrase, common sense. Common sense is a very important skill to have. Read More...

Just the two of us - TV comedy script

During last month and this month, the BBC have been running a television sitcom or 'narrative comedy' competition. Even though I haven't had much luck with the BBC up to now, I'm still very keen to keep trying. For this competition, the BBC wanted entrants to write a one page description of a narrative comedy idea along with a sample episode of between fifteen and thirty pages. The full details are here at the Laughing Stock website. I've now submitted an entry called 'Just the two of us'. Read More...

Carry a Rubber Ball. Make it part of your healthy lifestyle!

It's driving me nuts, that Benecol margarine spread advert on the radio. It's the one where they interview various people who say that they changed their lifestyle because they were worried about their health. They explain how they started exercising and avoiding unhealthy food and, along with all that, they had some Benecol margarine. Straight after saying that, they say their cholesterol levels went down and they'd recommend anyone else taking Benecol. So Benecol reduces cholesterol? Does it? Does it my backside! Read More...

Cort guitars and being a selfish, affluent Western scumbag

About a year ago, I wanted a travel guitar to take with me on holiday and to music festivals. I had had a brief look the previous summer when I’d been to a music festival. There were several choices available; a Taylor Big Baby, an Ozark travel guitar and a Cort Earth-Mini. I tried them all.

The Ozark travel guitar was certainly very portable but it looked like a piece of equipment from an extinct outdoor sport. I wasn’t sure whether to play it or find an old feathery rubber ball to hit with it. Unfortunately, the sound wasn’t brilliant either. Since the Ozark has no sizeable resonating chamber, the instrument isn’t much different from playing a guitar that’s been sliced in half.

Read More...

My writing mistakes - volume 1

I thought it would be good to write about all the writing mistakes I’ve made. When writing is done well, it looks simple and effortless. Cormac McCarthy’s ‘The Road’ is a good example, along with anything by John Steinbeck. The problem is that a fledgling writer can easily think that excellent prose is simple to do because it looks simple. I made that mistake. In fact, I made so many mistakes that I’ve lost track of all of them. Writing good prose is like having a slim, fit body. A lucky few can develop one with even seeming to try. For the rest of us, it’s an endless effort to keep off the flab.
Here is a list of my most memorable mistakes. If you’ve read about them in an earlier blog of mine, I apologise. I also mistakenly repeat things.

Read More...

The power of 'up to'

The biggest advertising strategy of the last twelve months (or more) has, I think, been the use of the phrase ‘up to’. It’s everywhere now in sales signs and adverts. ‘Up to 50% off!’, ‘Up to 70% off!’. You’d think that most people on seeing these signs must say to themselves ‘well, that doesn’t mean very much’ but retailers clearly don’t regard that as a problem. Based on how much it’s being used, companies in the U.K. seem to think it’s a sure winner for improving their sales. They’re confident that telling people that at least one of their five thousand items in stock will be 70% off in the upcoming sale, even though that single item has probably all the desirability and functionality of owning a deranged skunk, is an actual winning formula.

Are we missing something here? Are these companies, with their skilled and experienced staff, pointing us in a new direction? If using ‘up to’ is such a gold mine, should we be trying to use it in aspects of our own lives? Maybe the power of ‘up to’ can be used in our emotional relationships?

Read More...

Navigation and the Ladies Internation Rescue Organisation

It’s always a good thing for men and women to find ways to understand each other better. If done properly, good male/female communication can, in particular, save the bloke from endless arguments, cold silences and comments like ‘that’s stupid’, ‘you’re not listening’ and sentences beginning with ‘my mum was right...’. To help improve this, I thought I’d write a short article about navigation.

Imagine that you’re in your car with your dearly beloved - your lovely female partner without whom life would be an empty wasteland of loneliness and poor personal hygiene. You’re both in the car on your way to an important social event, a place that you both will reach in time, if all goes well, but there’s not a lot of room to spare. You’re driving along and you spot a side street. You realise that if you head down that side street, there’s a very good chance that you’ll end up on a road you know that’ll take you to the destination quicker. ‘Ahah!’ you think, ‘I’ll take that shortcut and I’ll have improved my knowledge of the area, speeded up my journey and my dearly beloved will be really grateful. We’ll be at the wedding/christening/graduation ceremony with time to spare. Hooray!’

I have three words of advice to give at this point:
Don’t do it!

Read More...