'Magicians of the Gods' book review

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My Christmas Holiday reading this year has been 'Magicians of the Gods' by Graham Hancock. Over the last couple of decades, Hancock has written a lot of very interesting books on Giza, Atlantis, South America and related topics and has been one of the leading lights working to promote the idea that Atlantis, or at least and advanced antediluvian civilisation, did exist but was wiped out at the end of our last ice-age. Fortunately for us, some of its inhabitants survived and helped re-start civilisation around the globe and the remains of those ancient civilisation are still present today in various sites, such as in South America, Egypt, Turkey, Indonesia and Australia.

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In Magicians of the Gods, Hancock puts forward evidence that an advanced antediluvian civilisation did exist on Earth in our last ice-age but was wiped out by the Younger Dryas impact, then a massive flood a thousand years after that terrible event, which also ended the ice-age, leaving Earth with a sea level far higher than before, thus drowning many ancient cities. A lot the related material has appeared in previous Hancock books, and so anyone who has read his previous books will be tempted to skim some pages of this one; I certainly did. In the end, I did enjoy 'Magicians of the Gods' but I think it added little new material to the topic that I hadn't heard before. I do still recommend it but perhaps it's more appropriate for someone just entering the whole topic of Atlantis.

I think it's also worth noting what Graham Hancock hasn't put in his book. Most importantly, Hancock is completely committed to the idea that the Younger Dryas Impact Event was caused by a periodic comet, akin to Halley's Comet. He mentions the Taurids and how our solar system's movement around our galactic centre brings us into regions of dense material, which trigger cometary events.

The problem with this periodic comet theory, which Hancock doesn't mention in his book, is that our ancestors clearly told us that the catastrophes that befall Earth, including the Younger Dryas Impact event, are fundamentally connected to celestial precession. Hancock's book makes this clear, as he talks extensively about the predictions engraved in Gobekli Tepi, something I've also written about. Therefore, the cataclysms our planet receives should therefore be causally linked to celestial precession; they should not just be a strange and astonishing coincidence. It's certainly possible that a periodic comet bombardment would precisely match the same periodicity as the precession of Earth's axis, but it's extremely unlikely.

Fortunately, Dr Paul Laviolette has shown in his book Earth Under Fire that there is a causal link between celestial precession and the bombardment of Earth by comets/asteroids. He explains that Earth's celestial precession is 2 x 12,960 years because the centre of our galaxy regularly sends out bursts of gravity, matter and energy and these bursts have entrained the spin of our planet. Along with these entraining gravity bursts come comets and asteroids, disturbed by the gravity wave, that pound our planet and cover it with interstellar dust, the 'black rain' mentioned in so many ancient stories.

The 'why' of the cometary strikes may be a point of discussion but Hancock does still state the same warning as Dr LaViolette does in his book. They both state categorically that we are due another bombardment at any moment, as we're 12,960 after the last bombardment, the Younger Dryas Impact Event. In 'Magicians of the Gods', Hancock gives a target date for this new bombardment of sometime between 1960 and 2040, based on his and others interpretation of the 'vulture stone' warning inscription at Gobekli Tepi. Dr LaViolette, in comparison, says the next bombardment and gravity-wave strike is imminent, a view he clearly stated in a recent email to me. There is also the Mesopotamian warning, stated in Gavin White's 'Babylonian Star Lore' book, that the next global cataclysm will occur when 'The Fox gnaws at the Rope of Heaven'. According to my research, the Fox is the star Polaris and the Rope of Heaven in the celestial North Pole, around which the stars rotate in our sky. Due to celestial precession, Polaris is at its closest point to the celestial North Pole at this very moment. In other words, the Fox is gnawing at the Rope of Heaven right now.

From my point of view, if my vivid dream is correct, then we won't have to wait until 2040 for the next bombardment, or even the next decade. Instead, the cataclysm is going to happen in the first few days of June, 2019. I'll only feel certain that my foreboding dream is correct if there is a major eruption/explosion in the first few days of the New Year, which the dream also predicted, but even if that eruption/explosion doesn't occur, I would still fully agree with Graham Hancock and Dr Paul LaViolette. We absolutely have to start preparing for a global cataclysm immediately.

'The Interrupted Journey' book review

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When it comes to the topic of UFOs, there is a marked difference between many peoples' casual impression of the whole field and how the subject appears when you make an effort to investigate it. The casual impression is that it's a fringe topic with only a few really meaningful events and that most of it is silly people saying daft things to get in the papers. I don't say this to sound elitist because I've had that view myself for many years. It is only recently, when I've had the time and energy to investigate the subject, that I've realised how different the issue of UFOs is when one does a in-depth study.

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If one properly investigates the subject of UFOs, then a very different world comes into sharp focus. As Timothy Good has explained in many books, there is an enormous amount of evidence all around our planet of human encounters with UFOs. It's certainly true that many of those encounters have little physical evidence and rely for a large part on eye-witness testimony. Such reports can therefore be dismissed as too thin for serious analysis, but there are also a very large number of reports that have many respectable witnesses and a host of supporting evidence, for example the UFO encounter in Rendlesham Forest. It is also clear that military forces around the world are grabbing as much of the physical evidence as they can and censoring reports before they reach the mainstream media. This is especially true of the United States military who have soldiers in more than 150 countries around the world (considering there are only officially 196 countries in total, this is a huge slice). If we also consider the simple fact that most Western media outlets will not publish anything that is marked classified, for sensible reasons, It is hardly surprising that if the U.S. military decides to put a lid on the UFO phenomena, it would become a fringe and murky subject. Read More...

'Command and Control' by Eric Schlosser - book review

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This week, I've been reading Eric Schlosser's 'Command and Control', an extensive and comprehensive non-fiction book that looks into the history of nuclear weapon safety in the U.S.A. since the Second World War. Schlosser wrote the excellent 'Fast Food Nation' and this book is just as thorough and just as alarming. Schlosser's book makes it clear, using an exhaustive list of events, that it's pretty much a miracle that a nuclear weapon didn't accidentally explode in the United States in the last sixty years.
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I'm a supporter of CND, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, and so I was keen to read this book to be as knowledgeable as possible on such an important subject. I came to the decision, several years ago, that I would rather be killed by a nuclear weapon than be even partly responsible for dropping one on millions of other people. There are many visceral examples of what such a nuclear strike would do in books and television, from an excellent passage in the book 'Doomsday Men', that I recently reviewed, as well as the harrowing and brilliant series 'Threads', made by the BBC (when the Beeb was being brave). I heartily recommend both items, but be aware, the Threads programme pulls no punches at all.

'Command and Control' is a thick wedge of a book. Schlosser exhaustively reports on the history of nukes in the U.S. and the cold war. To be honest, there were sections that I skipped, as page after page of descriptions of missiles and strategies can get dull. Fortunately, the book switches between this history and the recounting of a particular event; a disastrous accident that occurred at a Titan II missile silo. Schlosser's account of the accident is riveting. His writing reminded me a lot of Stephen King's 'The Stand', with the same approach of giving each character's back story, before narrating what happened to them during the accident. I wouldn't be surprised if Schlosser starts writing fiction soon, he's certainly prepared the ground.
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Heisenberg: Physics and Philosophy - book review

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This week, I've been reading 'Physics and Philosophy' by Werner Heisenberg. Heisenberg was one of the leading lights of the Quantum Physics generation in the early twentieth century. He was the prime discoverer of the Uncertainty Principle; that it is impossible to know both the velocity and position of a subatomic particle at the same time.

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I'll say, straight away, that 'Physics and Philosophy' is a dry read; the book is never going to succeed as a mainstream popular science book. Heisenberg writes like a physics professor giving a church sermon, but he also writes with an air of calm authority. He isn't polemicist or a demagogue. There's no sign that he has an axe to grind. As a result, the book reads as a benchmark of sober thought on the philosophical implications of what physicists discovered in the early twentieth century.

During his book, Heisenberg stays very much in the middle ground of the philosophical interpretations of quantum physics. He never concludes that the mind is required for matter to appear out of the quantum realm, unlike Wigner and Von Neumann, but neither does he follow the lead of Einstein and doggedly advocate the Classical Physics viewpoint of an external reality that is present and real all the time, whether we observe it or not. Instead, he talks calmly about what he thinks we can reliably conclude from the experimental evidence and the mathematics, and how that is elegant and beautiful and sufficient just by itself. Read More...

Fever: a magical cancer cure

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This week, I've been reading 'Farmer Buckley's Exploding Trousers and other odd events on the way to scientific discovery'. It's a popular science book from the people at New Scientist magazine and is a series of short stories (each a few pages long) about weird and wonderful and often very important scientific and technological inventions and discoveries. I'm enjoying the book, although reading a long string of disconnected stories can feel a bit laborious sometimes, but there some absolute gems amongst the collection.

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One story really jumped out. On page 21 of the book, the author describes the fascinating story of Dr William Coley, an American doctor living and working in New York in the 1870's. During his work, Dr Coley stumbled upon a fascinating pattern. He treated many patients with tumours. The standard medical treatment for these tumours was to cut them out, but they invariably grew back. Coley found that patients who had tumours, but then suffered an infection that sent them into a high fever, very often were entirely cured of their tumours. For example:

The man's medical records were quite clear. His case was hopeless. In the space of three years, he had had five operations to remove a tumour from his neck. The last was a failure: it was impossible to remove the whole tumour. He would die soon. As if that wasn't bad enough, the poor man then suffered two attacks of erysipelas, a skin infection that produced a lurid red rash and a high fever. But when the fever broke and the man recovered, his tumour had vanished. Seven years later, he was still alive and well. There could be only one explanation: whatever had caused the fever had also destroyed the cancer.

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'Supernormal' book review and Influence Idea thoughts

The purpose of this article is to review a book, but I thought I’d chat some more about the Influence Idea and 'Reality is Light' before the review, as they are connected. Just a quick note: The links in the following paragraphs connect to the larger articles I’ve written about these ideas, available elsewhere on this website, so feel free to switch to them if you'd like a fuller explanation.

To start off with, I'll explain the Influence Idea again, briefly. It's surprisingly simple. The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that everything in our physical universe becomes more disordered over time; this is called Entropy, but something strange is going on because Life becomes more ordered over time. Life grows, develops and reproduces, constantly increasing order in the universe. Since Life exists in the universe, and is clearly acting entirely against Entropy, and Entropy governs all physical things in the universe then, logically, Life must be being created and maintained by a non-physical, positive, organising influence originating from outside physical reality.
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Doomsday Men and Dr Strangelove

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Here's a quick book review of a book I've just finished called 'Doomsday Men' by P.D.Smith. The book is all about the history of atomic research, from Madame Curie onwards, and how it became used to build the ultimate military weapon, the hydrogen bomb and its fictional but apocalyptic dark sibling, the radioactive 'cobalt bomb'.

I enjoyed the book. It was pretty clear from early on (in fact, P.D.Smith admitted as much himself) that the author had been writing a biography of Leo Szilard, an admirable and brilliant Hungarian physicist who had to leave his home in Budapest when Nazism and anti-Semitism emerged in central Europe. He ditched up in London and finally emigrated to the United States. Unlike other brilliant Hungarian physicists who ended up playing a major role in the development of atomic power and the atomic bomb (such as Von Neumann and Edward Teller), Szilard was a compassionate and ethical man. Read More...

The Utter horror of the 'three for two' offer

I was in Waterstones today to buy a present for a relative. I had a rough idea what I was after and went straight to the appropriate section. There, stacked neatly on the shelf, were two books by John Lindqvist, the writer behind the hit Scandinavian film ‘Let the Right One In’, which I think is currently being remade in America on the grounds that the original is full of foreigners who talk funny. They’ve also shortened the title to ‘Let Me In’. I guess this is because a) no movie about Vampires should ever refer to them as ‘The Right One’ or b) Five words in a title is too long. Since ‘Twilight’ and ‘True Blood’ are incredibly popular and are stuffed full of blood sucking creatures of the night who somehow retain tender romantic feelings while their souls sit writhing in the nethermost depths of hell, I’m guessing it’s mostly about the title length.


Film tie-ins aside, I picked up the two books by Lindqvist that I wanted. Sorted! I could go home and have a cup of tea. Then I spotted something. Sitting prominently on the front cover of both books was a sticker marked ‘3 for 2’. Oh. That’s good, I thought. I have two books I want. I can pick up a third for nothing. I looked around casually. There were lots of ‘3 for 2’ books on the tables around. I’ll definitely want one of those.


The only thing was, each one I spotted I didn’t want.

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My favourite cycling books and films

A friend asked me recently to recommend some cycling books and films. Instead of just telling him, I thought I'd stick them on my blog so everyone can check them out.

First off, an absolute gem of a French animated movie called 'Belleville Rendezvous'. There's not much dialogue but there doesn't have to be. The expressions and actions tell you everything you need to know. A young french lad is given a bicycle and it transforms his life. With the help of his grandmother, he becomes a professional racer (incredibly skinny apart from HUGE thighs). He takes part in the Tour de France but ends up in the broom wagon. From there, he is kidnapped, taken to New York and made to take part in a 'simulation' Tour De France ran by gambling gangsters. Strange, magical, often hysterically funny. The only criticism I would have is that the middle section about the three old ladies - the Belleville triplets - drags on a little too long. Apart from that, brilliant.

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